Path to Zero
Path to Zero
4.02 - ABC News Meteorologist Ginger Zee Talks Conservation and Climate
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Path to Zero’s special Climate Week conversations from New York continue with a visit from ABC News’ climate unit and chief meteorologist Ginger Zee.

She stopped by to talk to Tucker on her way to speak at a Climate Week opening day event.

Zee shared her passion for promoting conservation, how she went from wanting to be a storm chaser to her successful television career and her new ABC News special on clean energy.

Resources

Transcript

Tucker Perkins:
Our guest in this episode of Path to Zero is playing a key role in Climate Week activities here in New York. You know her from Good Morning America as the Chief Meteorologist and the Managing Editor of the Climate Unit at ABC News. It’s great to welcome Ginger Zee to Path to Zero. Thanks for being here, Ginger-

Ginger Zee:
Thank you.

Tucker Perkins:
… and welcome to Path to Zero.

Ginger Zee:
I’m happy to be here.

Tucker Perkins:
I’m glad to have you. I know you’re a big part of Climate Week, and I know you’re stopping by here on your way to give a big talk tonight. Tell us who you’re talking to, and maybe what you’re going to talk about.

Ginger Zee:
This talk is really interesting because it’s not just me talking. Anybody can stand up and say what they’ve done and promote what they’re doing. What I love about what we’re doing tonight is we’re taking an activist, a young activist, who is usually the person standing outside of big media saying, “You’re not doing enough,” and they will be the ones interviewing us.

Ginger Zee:
And so myself and Mark Hertsgaard from Covering Climate Now, which is a great group that has made all of these journalists committed and responsible for covering climate to a certain degree or greater, and then having someone who’s going to elevate it and take us to the next place. So, it’s going to be, hopefully, a little bit. I hope I get a little sweaty.

Tucker Perkins:
That’d be awesome. It’s nice to be pushed every now and then, right?

Ginger Zee:
Yes. I think maybe because I’m a meteorologist, I like to take people’s crap. That’s what I do really well. So, I look forward to it. And I think that they should be pushing. I agree with them. I think that it’s important to push people who have the ability to tell the stories that need to be told broadly.

Tucker Perkins:
I know you’ve been a meteorologist for some time. You find people’s attitudes are changing now around climate change. I mean, I know there was a long period of time where at least I felt like denying was okay. But do you find that people’s attitudes are changing now towards climate?

Ginger Zee:
No question. I started being a meteorologist on television in the year 2000. So, I’ve been in and around people asking that question, do you believe in climate? For 22 years. And I’ve seen a huge increase in the ability for people to know what they’re saying and to understand that it’s not a belief, rather science being reported as we know it.

Ginger Zee:
Where I think we need a lot of work is that it’s not about believing or not believing. It’s just saying, “Here’s what we know. Here’s what we don’t know. Now, let’s go forward with what we know and do the things that need to be done to achieve not throwing ourselves into a complete spiral.” And I think that’s the part that’s maybe a little difficult.

Ginger Zee:
And it does have a lot of parallels to meteorology, because our science of meteorology, even in the last 22 years, has come a long way, but societally, it always takes people a long time to catch up. I still have people saying the old, funny thing of, “You must be great having a job where you can be wrong half the time.” It’s not funny anymore. It’s wrong. It wasn’t even funny then, and it’s just dead wrong.

Ginger Zee:
If we’re so bad, why are you looking at your phone every 10 minutes to see what the temperature’s going to be? The science has really grown. Same thing with climate science. So, denial-ism is just either a hangover of people who haven’t educated themselves or heard anything, or it’s just them trying to be stinky.

Tucker Perkins:
In your time at ABC, you really pushed to go beyond just reporting the weather and then really start leading the reporting on climate. How has that been going for you?

Ginger Zee:
The why of why I do what I do has evolved so much. I went to school to study and chase storms. I didn’t go to school to be in broadcasting. That part of it came as a big change in my why. Once I started broadcasting and I did my first big storm, which was Hurricane Katrina, a great big storm to be in, my why went from super nerdy weather, interested in how big a storm surge at 22 feet looks like to, “Oh my gosh, this isn’t about how the storm surge looks. This is about people.”

Ginger Zee:
And that went and brought my passion for the science into the compassion or humanity. And then in Hurricane Michael, and a lot happened between those two, but in 2018, I was there in the eyewall of a Cat 5. The forecast was so dead on that I could be exactly where I wanted to be, watching what I had forecasted, told stories about for years and years.

Ginger Zee:
And I am watching homes twist off their foundation, bob down the street and rip apart. And all I could think was, “I’m watching the people die.” The stories of all the people who have told me their stories and so, just happening in my head. I’m watching the 3D graphic that I made happen in real life.

Ginger Zee:
And as we walked out of that storm, it was the first time where I ran into lots of people, a dozen or more that said… They didn’t say… I always ask, “Well, why did you stay?” And storms passed. It was like, “Oh, well, we got looted in the last one and it didn’t happen.” This time it was, “I don’t have a car. I don’t speak English.”

Ginger Zee:
The privilege that most of us live in that we would think that people have choice became a new part of my why. And I go back to why this means why I have to do more of the climate change, because there are so many stories beyond just the storm. And as we see the increase in intensity, and we don’t make change until the stop sign, or for a stop sign until we get an accident, our accidents are happening more often.

Ginger Zee:
So that’s where I thought by why in the last decade have become more and more… Well, let’s look at the bigger picture, not just this one thing. But when we can attribute it to climate change, holy cow, we need to tell that part of the story.

Tucker Perkins:
It is interesting. I feel like… I don’t know. I felt like five or six years ago. Maybe people didn’t really necessarily equate the two, but now it seems like everybody equates the two and clearly we seem to be moving towards a period where we’re going to continue with more and more. Where do you find the right parts of the improvements we’re making to the climate and maybe not just in the US, but maybe around the world. Where do you see a couple bright spots?

Ginger Zee:
Oh, there’s so many bright spots. I look at how we innovate in everything, but I think exciting stories that I’ve told in energy. I was just at Princeton University a couple of months ago where they’re working on solid-state battery for lithium, which would take… Right now, under a Tesla or any electric vehicle, you have this giant battery.

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
That’s the chassis of the car. That can’t be changed out somewhere.

Tucker Perkins:
No. It can’t be the long term solution.

Ginger Zee:
It won’t be. And that’s the exciting part.

Tucker Perkins:
Yeah. Right.

Ginger Zee:
But that’s good for now. It is.

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
And it works really well and we’re getting there. The cool part is there’s so much money and so much brain power going into the solid-state lithium. She believes that within the next five to 10 tops years, we will be able to have a battery that you hold in your hands. Can you imagine if you could bring an extra one in your trunk, flip one out, put another one in. Get one at a battery station.

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
This is going to change. And I think those types of innovations, realizing what our phones looked like 25 years ago, what they look like today, I have great hope. We’re going to figure this out. And you know what? People are going to make money. And when that starts to be behind it, you know what’s going to happen.

Tucker Perkins:
Right. Massive money flowing. In fact, that’s the center of fusion study as well for nuclear, I guess. I love that Princeton community, because at least the one place that I see where they combined technology with politics, with science and then human factors. And rarely do I see that, because again, as we see with power lines, right?

Ginger Zee:
Yeah.

Tucker Perkins:
We can develop power plants, but we can’t connect them to where the people are. Useless.

Ginger Zee:
Right.

Tucker Perkins:
And at Princeton, they seem to take such a holistic view of [inaudible].

Ginger Zee:
And business.

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
They take it and make it into a business.

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
This was a lab gone, turned immediately into a business within a couple of years. And that gives those students… It’s funny because they have the different parts. They have the scientists who figured it out. They’ve got the business guys that came in to make it actually go and now they’re going to take it to scale.

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
And they have a new facility in Dallas, part of new energy, not just the solid state battery, but is how they’re recycling it. So in my new special coming up, you’ll also see how their science at Princeton is changing the way that we can recycle the existing batteries and the batteries to come. It makes it half the cost, way more energy-efficient by like 70% and it’s 80% better with water.

Tucker Perkins:
So batteries are a place you see a future-

Ginger Zee:
Yes.

Tucker Perkins:
… and great change? Anything else?

Ginger Zee:
Oh, I think renewables. I think I get excited about the future. And when you say renewable, I think everyone just stops at wind and solar and they’re like, “Ugh,” and they have issue with many of them. I think there’s so many things. I was lucky enough to grow up in a home with geothermal energy-

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
… and just looking at how we can harness the power of hydro. There are a couple of really exciting ventures happening and one’s coming to the port of LA in, I think it’s late November now. It’s already been tested in Israel and Portugal and it is just like a bucket that picks up water and drops it. And that works on a hydraulic and that creates…

Ginger Zee:
It has no impact to Marine life. It doesn’t make a ton of noise. It splashes with the waves, but it really is just using what we have and using the power of earth and providing huge amounts of energy, even in places that don’t have a dam.

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
You don’t have to create. And that’s the thing is we’ve done a lot of engineered reality and that’s what we live in now, which is wonderful and it worked for a lot of the ways and the economy and things. But these are the ones that are not touching what we already have and thinking of it now, before we mess it up just for our own pleasure.

Tucker Perkins:
Yeah. What are some of the things like wave action-

Ginger Zee:
Yes. It’s a wave. It’s called eco-wave.

Tucker Perkins:
I mean, there’s so many cool things there.

Ginger Zee:
Yeah.

Tucker Perkins:
Yeah. Anything else? I’m just loving… I’m a technologist, so when you talk about these technologies, I like it.

Ginger Zee:
Yeah. I think that’s… Well, and then I get inspired about people. I think their connection to the planet and to the things that they… I don’t think everyone will ever be all fully on board. I think the plastic pollution thing scares me more than most stuff, because I think ease, greed and who’s funding and fueling plastics freaks me out. That isn’t as much a climate thing, but I think I’d rather take some care of the micro-plastics that are in my water right now, right?

Tucker Perkins:
Yeah.

Ginger Zee:
Those types of things actually leave me a little-

Tucker Perkins:
Just a sheer volume.

Ginger Zee:
Yes. And then we are the number one plastic producer and people always want to place blame on the rest of the world. And I think it excites me that hopefully people are ready to listen, because I always wonder, I’m like, “Who are these people that want plastic everywhere?”

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
That can’t be. We got to figure this out, right?

Tucker Perkins:
That’s really more about a health thing. Yeah.

Ginger Zee:
Seems like a non-controversial thing-

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
… that you wouldn’t want that. But I think that there’s… Unfortunately that’s the one I… I get more excited when I see technology, money. But to pull back from what we’ve already done, I think that’s harder.

Tucker Perkins:
Yeah. I mean, even what’s pouring in out of carbon capture-

Ginger Zee:
Yeah. Yeah.

Tucker Perkins:
… pouring into fusion. What’s pouring in batteries are just the big thing. We do need to do something there. So maybe beyond plastics, anything else really frustrate you?

Ginger Zee:
I think just the tropes, those things that people have heard 10, 15, 20 years ago. It’s very equivalent to the meteorology thing where they’re saying the same thing or they’re still calling me a weather girl. Just learn. That’s not it. We have to evolve. And I think being ready and open to doing that…

Ginger Zee:
I don’t know everything. I’m learning things every single day. I’m just here to learn along with you. People, for some reason… This is where people no longer say, “Do you believe?” They say, “You’re part of the communist mission to…”

Ginger Zee:
They have these preconceived ideas about who I am and what I do. And just because I’m reporting on battery technology. It’s the strangest thing. And that frustrates me. And I guess that goes to the cliché, division of America and division of the world, but that’s going to hurt in everything. But especially in climate change.

Tucker Perkins:
Yeah. True. Yeah. It’s such an… I guess it just fits the narrative you want to believe sometimes, and that’s what you listen to.

Ginger Zee:
That’s what they’re always saying. And I’m like, “No, no. I’m just talking to the people who are doing the work,” and while I do think that the battery stuff is exciting, if there’s something wrong with it, if there’s… Like, in my battery special, we are attacking the reality that to mine America, to the point that we need to, is not going to happen, even if we went all out in the next decade. It just can’t.

Ginger Zee:
This new cobalt mine that we went and visited in Idaho, the first cobalt mine in America in more than 30 years because we haven’t done it and we used to do it really poorly. It’s only going to be able to create 10% of the need that we require in America now.

Tucker Perkins:
In the US, right?

Ginger Zee:
Now. And that’s going to exponentially grow with the battery power and renewables that we intend or supposedly are going to have. So how are we really going to do this domestically? How can we have our oil of now, meaning those minerals? And so we’re going to take a really hard look at that and be honest about that. I’m not sugarcoating it for fun, right?

Tucker Perkins:
I think it goes back there to that battery technology you’re seeing at Princeton, is that you begin to see them either emphasizing, not using some of that or clearly using less and less.

Ginger Zee:
Clearly using less and also realizing the value-

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
… and then finding great ways to 100% recycle it.

Tucker Perkins:
So what you saw at least gave you hope that we can mine cobalt-

Ginger Zee:
Yes.

Tucker Perkins:
… in the US and do it in a way that you, as a neighbor would use and labor laws? Because that’s good. I don’t always agree with that.

Ginger Zee:
Well, and that’s because cobalt specifically has had… 60% of it is mined from the DRC-

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
… and it has had horrible children working in terrible conditions. It’s caused huge health concerns over there. First of all, we shouldn’t be getting it from other places when we have it in our country. Anyway, I think everybody can.

Ginger Zee:
And this is actually where I think politically, this could bring us all together. Because if you’re building an economy here and you can do it in an environmentally friendly way, who’s to say we shouldn’t do that?

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
Now, do we need to limit the number? Do you need a brand new cell phone every other year? Do we need a new laptop? Those are the things that we’re going to have to also, as a society, look at because we got to slow the role on how much we need.

Tucker Perkins:
And nobody ever talks about that, do they?

Ginger Zee:
No, they don’t.

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
And that’s the part. But also do we all want to go back to no cell phone then that’s the only way that we don’t mind, or don’t find ways to 100% recycle what we have.

Tucker Perkins:
We’ll never go back-

Ginger Zee:
We’re never going to go back.

Tucker Perkins:
… in GDP and lifestyle.

Ginger Zee:
And so in this special, we’re going to attack the next frontier of mining, the deep sea mining, which is one of the most controversial places out there now in the energy field. And I’m going at this in the most wide-eyed, let me learn everything I can because nobody really knows. And both sides are saying nobody knows, but then they say, “But we’re right.” And I’ve found that, as a journalist reporting on this, I came away with, I don’t know what’s going to happen except for, I think money will win, as it always has.

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
But in this special, that’s kind of how I started. I say, “Listen, we’ve always done this. We’ve gone full force.” We’re like, “Oh my gosh, look, we don’t have to kill whales anymore. There’s something called coal.” And then we went all in without even thinking or knowing, we probably couldn’t have known scientifically for a while, what was going to be the implication of that? Everything we do, because we are taking something from the planet to burn or to whatever, is going to have impact. How do we do it, knowingly doing the least, but gaining the most when it comes to electrifying America, say?

Tucker Perkins:
Yeah, there’s Bob Ballard. Do you know who Bob Ballard is?

Ginger Zee:
Mm-hmm. I’ve heard of Bob.

Tucker Perkins:
Great undersea researcher. Talked to me, six years ago now, about undersea mining and minerals. Really, even at that time, it was when America to a degree and our interests were jockeying with China and their interest for a lot of spots that no one ever talked about. But even then he was talking about the value that we would see in undersea mines.

Ginger Zee:
Yeah. And I think that’s… When I first heard about it and I started studying it, there’s just these little tangerine size lumpy, rock-looking things. And inside of them, everything you need for a cathode for an electric vehicle for battery. And so you’ve got nickel, manganese, copper, and cobalt, all of those things. And there are millions of them-

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
… sitting 200 miles west of Mexico. And there’s one company, The Metals Company, who’s taken the lead on this and they’ve done their own experiments and they’re testing environmental conditions. A lot of other people are saying, “We have no idea what’s down there. There are so many microorganisms. If you throw one thing off, you could throw this whole thing off.”

Ginger Zee:
The International Seabed Authority, who are the people who are going to give them the permits eventually, they’re in the middle of it right now, and they’re going to be driven by money for sure. But again, can we even get domestically to the point that we need to, to reduce emissions here if we don’t do that? I don’t know.

Tucker Perkins:
Right. Yeah.

Ginger Zee:
That’s the… Yeah. So those are the numbers we run in the special.

Tucker Perkins:
Soon, a little… Yeah.

Ginger Zee:
Yes.

Tucker Perkins:
Sustainable ocean farming will be interesting.

Ginger Zee:
Right.

Tucker Perkins:
I’ve been following that very closely.

Ginger Zee:
Yeah. Yeah. It’s fascinating.

Tucker Perkins:
So we will start to wrap up. Tell our viewers and listeners, once more, you’re working on a special, when can they expect it? Maybe what… Tease them a little bit about that.

Ginger Zee:
Yes. Tuesday night, 8:30 PM. So after September 20th, you can see it anytime on Hulu and on ABC News Live. And so we’ll have links posted everywhere, but it’s a streaming special and it goes through everything we’ve just spoken about and so much more.

Tucker Perkins:
Awesome.

Ginger Zee:
If you want something on mining and deep sea mining, this is the half hour for you.

Tucker Perkins:
Well, you’ve already spoken about a couple of things that very few people talk about, but one there, because really this is the first time is just conservation, and maybe don’t get a cell phone every other six weeks. We’re seeing that now. We’re seeing certainly Germany and England doing something with conservation that we really hadn’t seen before.

Ginger Zee:
Yeah. It’s really-

Tucker Perkins:
It’s really seen in California with some of those last heat spills.

Ginger Zee:
And that’s where policy does make a difference.

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
Right? And that’s where… Policy always does. But I’m saying can really make an impact. When the UK said, “We’re going to not have any cell phone company change the adapter,” that right there saved, I don’t know how many tons of copper that needs to be mined-

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
… but a lot. Because my cord has worked for as long as I’ve had my phone. If you give me a new phone and now it’s got a new jack, you just changed the whole thing and then I need a new… Those all add up-

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
… because every single one of us has 10 of them in a drawer. And then on top of that, and what we’ll talk about a little bit in this special is, imagine if we mined our drawers, how many do you have at home?

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
Old cell phones, laptops. We got a lot. And so if we actually took that and how much more would that create in the circular economy and how… We just have to make it easy for people or incentivize it, but that comes from policy.

Tucker Perkins:
Yeah. If done right, it’s a massive improvement in, not only less disposal, but getting those good materials.

Ginger Zee:
Yeah.

Tucker Perkins:
All right. So let’s finish it up a little bit. We want to have a little bit of fun. So let’s have a little fun here. Just a bit of magic. Give you a magic wand. You get to use it to make one wish for one thing in one year that would have the greatest impact as you see it in this conversation around climate sustainability, how would you use your wand?

Ginger Zee:
It’s funny. I always ask people that question, but-

Tucker Perkins:
Do you?

Ginger Zee:
Yeah.

Tucker Perkins:
I thought that was our question.

Ginger Zee:
No. I definitely ask people that one a lot and I like it because it’s impossible to choose one. There are so many places like water. I mean I grew up in Grand Rapids and just north where we have a PFAS situation. I think I’d attack water. But then I thought, “No, let’s go bigger than that and go to conservation because I think I would start by doing the challenge that I found very simple with clothing, but now I’ve taken on a new challenge and I’ll start. I believe it starts in October.

Ginger Zee:
I’d love for everyone for a year to say, “Don’t buy anything new that you don’t absolutely need.” Like a toothbrush, sure. If your toothbrush… There are those necessities, but if we can do the no-new-things challenge and have everyone just take stock of what they do and what… And then I’ll have the people who will say to me, “Oh, really nice from your place of privilege to tell me not to buy anything.”

Ginger Zee:
It’s not about that. It’s about rechecking whether you shop… It doesn’t matter where you shop or what you do. A lot of us, at least in America, where we live in a place, many of us have privilege could take a moment and look at what we consume.

Tucker Perkins:
Needless consumption.

Ginger Zee:
Needless consumption. And it happens so much than I think people are aware of. We have been conditioned, and this is not a popular. This one gets me in trouble more than anything. There are a couple of things that piss people off [inaudible] broadly upsets people.

Announcer:
Thank you for listening to a special edition of Path to Zero with Tucker Perkins from Climate Week in New York City. If you like what you’ve heard, subscribe and rate us on your favorite podcast app. You can email us with questions or comments to [email protected]

Ginger Zee:
When I tell them, and I don’t like green grass, because I think it’s pointless in a lot of places and it takes too much water.

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
If you ever try to tell someone where they should live or not live based on natural cycles of the planet, wildfire, that usually gets them. But to tell them not to buy things? When I did The Port of LA story, talking about all those ships sitting there and the emissions and the air quality, I was like the Grinch. That’s not my intention, but I do think that it’s worth being aware.

Tucker Perkins:
It’s amazing how you can set people off.

Ginger Zee:
Oh, it’s exciting, isn’t it?

Tucker Perkins:
But, yeah. Everything you just said is spot on and probably necessary. I mean, having some conscious thought about how we are living our life on this planet. And I have to say, I’ve been in this intensely for maybe five years. I can count on one hand the number of people that want to talk about conservation or even sustainable living; Water, food, energy. This is not there.

Ginger Zee:
Maybe because I grew up with my dad, he’s from the Netherlands and he is painfully frugal.

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
And so we grew up to the point where showers were kept short because of water. We pay for it.

Tucker Perkins:
Right.

Ginger Zee:
But also because the earth only has so much clean water, he’s a geologist. So he just knew a lot about that. Energy was in critical to keep low. We always were on the edge of pretty uncomfortable temperature-wise on both sides of the summer and winter.

Tucker Perkins:
I grew up in [inaudible] house too.

Ginger Zee:
Yes. But I think there’s something to that to understanding the lack of need to go excess and eating every bite and the food waste. And if we looked at our own and I shouldn’t say that, it is not about us. We also have to then vote and push for other people. So my wand has two parts. My wand has the personal understanding and then the people.

Ginger Zee:
I think we got to push everybody and say, I mean vote with our dollar. Yes. Like, if my lotion that I like for my face, isn’t going to change to post-consumer waste or recycled lotion, I’m not using them anymore, but I’m super informed. I think we have to go bigger, bigger and vote for the people and the things that we know and believe in are going to be great for ourselves, our health and then our planet

Tucker Perkins:
And well said. Well said. All right, last thing. In honor of the time you spend with us and we’d like to plant a tree in a national forest in your name and in your honor.

Ginger Zee:
That’s so nice.

Tucker Perkins:
You’re a Michigander-

Ginger Zee:
Yes.

Tucker Perkins:
… so I’m guessing you were going to pick Michigan, but I’ll let you pick a forest for us.

Ginger Zee:
Manistee National Forest.

Tucker Perkins:
Absolutely.

Ginger Zee:
That one is where I camped growing up. My husband’s sitting here and he hates camping so much and it’s beautiful and there are all these trees that you sleep in.

Tucker Perkins:
Done just right.

Ginger Zee:
Yes. It’s a really gorgeous… Right on the Lake Michigan. It’s so pretty. So, that’d be great.

Tucker Perkins:
Awesome. We will be glad to do that.

Ginger Zee:
Thank you.

Tucker Perkins:
It’s easily done. Anything else you want to tell our listeners before we leave?

Ginger Zee:
No, I’d say just if… Everyone’s doing important reporting and we’re trying to do more and I think that if you get engaged… I love hearing from people what they like to know more about. That drives a lot of my reporting. When I started It’s Not Too Late, this weekly segment, I do three years ago, almost.

Ginger Zee:
I did the first one. And then ever since then, people’s comments, I’ll go off of them and say, “That’s a great idea,” because that’s what people want to know. The social media has great intention with that, with the engagement of seeing and getting the pulse of what people really don’t understand or need to know more about. So I say reach out. You never… And be engaged.

Tucker Perkins:
Yeah. It’s such a complex subject in general-

Ginger Zee:
Yes.

Tucker Perkins:
… for you to be able to talk about it in simple terms that people can understand. It’s always lovely.

Ginger Zee:
Thank you.

Tucker Perkins:
So thanks. So love what you’re doing. Ginger Zee-

Ginger Zee:
Thank you.

Tucker Perkins:
… Chief Meteorologist, Head of the Climate Group for ABC, headlining Climate Week here in New York this week. So thank you so much for being with us on Path to Zero.

Ginger Zee:
Thank you. Wish me luck.